Ruger’s Brigade Monument (12-1-3)

The Twelfth Corps’  First Division’s Third Brigade is honored by a monument.

Monument to Ruger / Colgrove's Brigade. Ruger's Brigade Gettysburg March 2012

Location: Colgrove Avenue, McAllister Woods.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
TWELFTH CORPS FIRST DIVISION
THIRD BRIGADE
Brig. Gen. Thomas H. Ruger
Col. Silas Colgrove
27th Indiana 2D Mass. 13th New Jersey
107th New York 3d Wisconsin Infantry

July 1. Arrived with the Division and bivouacked for the night east of rock Creek.

July 2. After sharp skirmishing in front crossed Rock Creek and went into position. The left on Culp’s Hill the right in McAllister’s Woods a swale between. Breastworks were constructed. At sunset went to support of the left of the Army and returned and found the works on left of swale occupied by Confederates. Those on the right were unoccupied and immediately repossessed.

July 3. The 2D Mass. and 27th Indiana in the morning charged across the open swale to get possession of a stone wall and woods on the left but were repulsed with great loss the 27th Indiana falling back in a direct line the 2D Mass. towards the left. A Confederate countercharge was made across the swale but receiving a front and enfilading fire it was quickly repulsed and the Confederate force left the works and retired across Rock Creek.

July 4. The Brigade with a battery and three regiments of First Brigade made a reconnaissance in front and around through the town the Confederate forces having withdrawn to Seminary Hill.

Casualties Killed 2 Officers 47 Men Wounded 20 Officers 205 Men Captured or Missing 5 Men Total 279

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Lockwood’s Brigade Monument (12-1-2)

The Twelfth Corps’  First Division’s Second Brigade is honored by a monument.

Lockwood's Brigade

Location: Slocum Avenue, south end, near Spangler’s Spring.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
TWELFTH CORPS FIRST DIVISION
SECOND BRIGADE
Brig. Gen. Henry H. Lockwood
1st Maryland Potomac Home Brigade
1st Maryland Eastern Shore
150th New York Infantry

July 2. The 1st Maryland Potomac Home Brigade and 150th New York arrived at 8 A. M. and went into position between Rock Creek and the Baltimore Pike on right of Division. Brig. Gen. Lockwood receiving orders direct from the General Commanding Corps. Late in the day the Brigade went with Division to support Third Corps line and advanced over the ground from which the Corps had previously been forced. The 150th New York drew off 3 abandoned guns of 9th Mass. Battery and returned about midnight.

July 3. Took part in the recapture of works which Major General Johnson’s Division took possession of during the absence of Division the previous night. At about 8 A. M. 1st Maryland Eastern Shore arrived and joined Brigade. Ordered in the afternoon to Second Corps line near Cemetery to render support where needed. The Brigade was not assigned to the Division until July 5th.

Casualties Killed 3 Officers 32 Men Wounded 3 Officers 118 Men Captured or Missing 18 Men Total 174

McDougall’s Brigade Monument (12-1-1)

The Twelfth Corps’  First Division’s First Brigade is honored by a monument.

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC TWELFTH CORPS FIRST DIVISION FIRST BRIGADE Col. Archibald L. McDougall 5th 20th Connecticut 3D Maryland 123D 145th New York 46th Penna. Infantry July 1. Marched from Littlestown and when within two miles of Gettysburg advanced on Wolf Hill then occupied by a Confederate force. Retired and bivouacked until morning. July 2. Crossed Rock Creek in the morning and formed in two lines on Culp’s Hill to the right of Second Division. The rear line behind a stone wall the front line forty yards in front where breastworks were immediately constructed. Late in the day went to support of Third Corps line and after dark returned and found the works and woods in rear in possession of Major Gen. Johnson’s Confederate Division. July 3. At daylight the Brigade with the artillery and infantry of the Corps attacked Major Gen. Johnson’s Division which had been reinforced from Major Gen. Early’s and Major Gen. Rodes’ Divisions and at 10.30 A. M. recaptured the works after a fierce contest. In the afternoon sent to the support of Second Corps. July 4. The 123D New York 5th Conn. and 46th Penna. with the regiments of Third Brigade and a battery made a reconnaissance in the morning in front and to the town of Gettysburg under Col. S. Colgrove and Major Gen. H. W. Slocum and found no Confederate forces. Casualties Killed 1 Officer 11 Men Wounded 4 Officers 56 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 7 Men Total 80 Gettysburg February 2009

Location: Slocum Avenue, south end.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
TWELFTH CORPS FIRST DIVISION
FIRST BRIGADE
Col. Archibald L. McDougall
5th 20th Connecticut 3D Maryland
123D 145th New York 46th Penna. Infantry

July 1. Marched from Littlestown and when within two miles of Gettysburg advanced on Wolf Hill then occupied by a Confederate force. Retired and bivouacked until morning.

July 2. Crossed Rock Creek in the morning and formed in two lines on Culp’s Hill to the right of Second Division. The rear line behind a stone wall the front line forty yards in front where breastworks were immediately constructed. Late in the day went to support of Third Corps line and after dark returned and found the works and woods in rear in possession of Major Gen. Johnson’s Confederate Division.

July 3. At daylight the Brigade with the artillery and infantry of the Corps attacked Major Gen. Johnson’s Division which had been reinforced from Major Gen. Early’s and Major Gen. Rodes’ Divisions and at 10.30 A. M. recaptured the works after a fierce contest. In the afternoon sent to the support of Second Corps.

July 4. The 123D New York 5th Conn. and 46th Penna. with the regiments of Third Brigade and a battery made a reconnaissance in the morning in front and to the town of Gettysburg under Col. S. Colgrove and Major Gen. H. W. Slocum and found no Confederate forces.

Casualties Killed 1 Officer 11 Men Wounded 4 Officers 56 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 7 Men Total 80

3rd Wisconsin Infantry

The 3rd Wisconsin Infantry Regiment served as members of Colgrove’s Brigade in Williams’ Division of the Twelfth Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by a monument.

Monument to the 3rd Wisconsin Infantry. Gettysburg December 2011

Dedicated: June 30, 1888.

Location: Monument located on the west side Colgrove Avenue. Monument marks the site occupied by the 3rd Wisconsin Volunteers on the morning of July 2, 1863, when they threw up a breastwork of earth and rail. At about 6:00 P.M., they moved to the left of the Union line and returned after dark to discover the Confederates in their works. They retook the works on the morning of July 3.

Description: Monument consists of a two-tiered rough-hewn base, a polished die with four small columns, a rough-hewn die and finial topped with a 12th Corps insignia star. Overall height: 17 feet.

46th Pennsylvania Infantry

The 46th Pennsylvania Infantry served in McDougall’s Brigade of William’s Division in the Twelfth Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by a monument.

Monument to the 46th Pennsylvania Infantry. Gettysburg August 2012

Dedicated: Sept. 12, 1889.

Location: Located on the east side of Slocum Avenue, above Spangler’s Spring. It indicates the position held by the 46th Pennsylvania Infantry on the morning of July 2, 1863 until the regiment left to support the Union left flank on July 3 until the close of the battle.

Description: Monument consists of a rough-hewn trapezoidal course on a polished pedestal and two-tiered smooth and rough-hewn base. A square relief of the Pennsylvania State Seal is affixed to the front and a polished, four-sided Corps star insignia is on the top. Monument is a multi-part granite shaft topped with a egimental symbol and set on a 6.6 foot square rough cut base that has a smooth cut front with a bronze tablet. The shaft has polished incised inscriptions, bronze medallion, and excised regimental symbol. Overall height is 12.1 feet. Flanking markers are one foot square. This monument has not been moved. The bronze plaque describing the events of July 3 & 4 was added in 1914.

150th New York Infantry (Position Marker)

The 150th New York Infantry Regiment served as members of Lockwood’s Brigade in Williams’ Division of the Twelfth Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by a monument and a position monument.

150th new york Gettysburg February 2009

Location: Position marker is located near the Trostle house on United States Avenue.

Description: Small stone monument with pyramid top. Denotes the regiment’s role in the recapture of Bigelow’s Battery on July 2, 1863. Marker is set on a natural boulder.

150th New York Infantry

The 150th New York Infantry Regiment served as members of Lockwood’s Brigade in Williams’ Division of the Twelfth Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by a monument and a position monument.

150th New York Gettysburg March 2008

Dedicated Sept. 17, 1889

Location: It indicates the position held by the 150th New York Infantry on July 3, 1863 from 6:00 to 8:30 A.M. under heavy Confederate fire. Indicates position held July 3, 1863 6-8:30 AM & 10-12 noon. Monument is located on the east side of North Slocum Avenue.

Description: The monument cost $4,400.00. Monument consists of five courses of rough-hewn granite and castellated pilasters and cap. Relief elements include a State Seal tondo, regimental flag and Corps star emblem. The monument is designed to be a “tower of invincible strength” and is composed of thirteen layers of stone (symbolic of the original 13 states). A bronze plaque contains the names of those who fell in the battle; an intertwined laurel and oak leaf bronze sculpture above the plaque symbolizes the citizen-soldier. The front of the monument contains a detailed history of the regiment. The monument was unveiled by Ketcham’s daughter; the flag used to drape the monument was the same flag that Sherman had raised over captured Atlanta. Monument that has two flanking markers and one position marker.