Baxter’s Brigade Monument (1-2-2)

The First Corps’ Second Division’s Second Brigade is honored by a monument.

Baxter's Brigade Monument. duplicate (20774) duplicate (20773) Gettysburg April 2011

Location: Located on the west side of Doubleday Avenue.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
FIRST CORPS SECOND DIVISION
SECOND BRIGADE
Brig. Gen. Henry Baxter
12th Mass 83D 97th New York
11th 88th 90th Pennsylvania Infantry

July 1. Arrived about noon took position on right of Corps on Mummasburg Road with Second Brigade First Division on left. Repulsed an attack of Col. O’Neal’s Brigade then changed front and with the assistance of Second Brigade First Division captured 1000 prisoners and three stand of colors of Brig. Gen. Iverson’s Brigade. Afterwards relieved by First Brigade and retired to the Railroad Cut to support Battery B 4th U. S. At 4 P. M. retired to Cemetery Hill and constructed breastworks. The 11th Penna. was transferred to the First Brigade.

July 2. About 10 A. M. relieved by Second Brigade Second Division Second Corps and placed in reserve. At 4 P. M. supported a battery of Eleventh Corps. At sunset moved to the support of Third Corps then returned to support of Eleventh Corps.

July 3. Moved to the rear of the cemetery early in the morning in support of Twelfth Corps. At 2 P. M. formed on right and rear of Third Division Second Corps and there remained until the close of the battle. The Brigade went into action with less than 1200 men.

Casualties Killed 7 Officers 3 Men Wounded 31 Officers 227 Men Captured or Missing 12 Officers 338 Men Total 648

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Paul’s Brigade Monument (1-2-1)

The First Corps’ Second Division’s First Brigade is honored by a monument.

Paul's Brigade Gettysburg October 2012

Location: Doubleday Avenue, south end, Oak Ridge.

Description: One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
FIRST CORPS SECOND DIVISION
FIRST BRIGADE
Brig. Gen. Gabriel R. Paul
Col. Samuel H. Leonard Col. Adrian R. Root
Col. Richard Coulter Col. Peter Lyle
16th Maine 13th Massachusetts
94th 104th New York 107th Penna. Infantry

July 1. Arrived about noon and went into position on the ridge near the Seminary and threw up Breastworks. About half past 2 R M. moved to the right of Corps in support of Second Brigade. Repulsed repeated attacks and was engaged until 4 R M. then retired to Seminary Ridge and constructed Breastworks. The 11th Penna. was transferred from the Second Brigade.

July 2. About noon relieved by Third Division Second Corps and went to rear in support of batteries on Cemetery Hill. At sunset moved to the left to support the Third Corps and returned to Cemetery Hill.

July 3. At 9 A. M. went to support of Twelfth Corps and at 3 P. M. to the left and took position on right of Second Corps in support of a battery and there remained until the close of the battle.

Casualties Killed 2 Officers 49 Men Wounded 36 Officers 321 Men Captured or Missing 40 Officers 593 Men Total 1041

107th Pennsylvania Infantry (Position Marker)

The 107th Pennsylvania Infantry served as members of Paul’s Brigade in Robinson’s Division of the First Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by a monument and a position marker.

107th Pennsylvania Marker, Cemetery Ridge. Gettysburg November 2009

Dedicated 1913.

Location:  North Hancock Avenue at Ziegler’s Grove.

Description: Marker is inscribed, The 107th Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry occupied this position during a part of July 2nd 1863. Went into action July 1st with 255 officers and men lost during the three days in killed wounded and missing 165 officers and men.

107th Pennsylvania Infantry

The 107th Pennsylvania Infantry served as members of Paul’s Brigade in Robinson’s Division of the First Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by a monument and a position marker.

Monument to the 107th Pennsylvania Infantry. duplicate (20289) duplicate (20288) Gettysburg April 2011

Dedicated Sept. 11, 1889.

Location:  It is located on the west side of Doubleday Avenue south of Robinson Avenue. It indicates the position held by the 107th Pennsylvania Infantry on July 1, 1863 from 1:00 P.M. until forced to retire toward town.

Description: Vertical, rectangular monument has polished and rough-hewn surfaces. It stands on a sloped plinth and low, rough-hewn base and has a crossed-gable cap. A square relief tablet of the State Seal is affixed to the front of the sculpture. Flank markers were added in 1913.

90th Pennsylvania Infantry (Boulder Marker)

The 90th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment served as members of Baxter’s Brigade in Robinson’s Division of the First Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments and a position stone.

Marker, 90th Pennsylvania Infantry. Gettysburg September 2009

Dedicated: 1889.

Location: South Hancock Avenue. The marker is located on Hancock Avenue near the Pennsylvania Monument.

Description: A large native boulder with bronze plaque affixed, erected in 1889 by Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Denotes position on July 2, 1863 against the attack by Confederate General Barksdale. 3.7×3.5 foot and 6.3 foot high

90th Pennsylvania Infantry (Second Monument)

The 90th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment served as members of Baxter’s Brigade in Robinson’s Division of the First Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments and a position stone.

Monument to the 90th Pennsylvania Infantry. original (20520) Gettysburg April 2011

Dedicated: 1888.

Location: Ziegler’s Grove, North Hancock Avenue.

Description: A bronze eagle with its wings spread rests atop a carved granite drum which rests atop a granite shaft. On the front of the granite shaft is a bronze plaque depicting a soldier’s canteen surrounded by oak leaves. It indicates the position held by the 90th Pennsylvania Infantry on the early afternoon of July 1, 1863, when attacked by Rodes’ Division until compelled to retreat. Monument is a smooth granite shaft with a cap that contains a bronze drum and eagle set on a 4.6 foot square base. The shaft has incised and excised inscriptions, a bronze tablet on the left side and a bronze bas-relief on the right side. Overall height is 10.8 feet. Flanking markers are ten inches square.

90th Pennsylvania Infantry

The 90th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment served as members of Baxter’s Brigade in Robinson’s Division of the First Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments and a position stone.

Monument to the 90th Pennsylvania Infantry. Gettysburg August 2011

Dedicated: Sept. 3, 1889.

Location: Oak Hill, east side of Doubleday Avenue. It indicates the position held by the 90th Pennsylvania Infantry on the early afternoon of July 1, 1863, when attacked by Rodes’ Division until compelled to retreat

Description: Sculpture depicts a branchless oak tree trunk from which various objects hang. These objects include a knapsack, cartridge box, rifle, Corps disk insignia, shield and State Seal. A bird perches on an upper branch where her nest and chick are located. Vines are draped around the lower portion of the trunk. The most notable feature of the monument is the bird’s nest with baby birds nestled inside while the mother bird keeps close watch over her brood. It is alleged that during the battle a soldier saw a robin’s nest tumble to the ground and he climbed up to replace it with the babies still alive inside. The “tree” stands fourteen feet high. Interestingly, the flank markers that mark the right and left flank of the regiment are also miniature tree stumps.