Bliss Farm Site (14th Connecticut Infantry)

The 14th Connecticut served as members of Smyth’s Brigade in Hays’ Division of the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments at Gettysburg, a main monument along North Hancock Avenue and a secondary monument at the Bliss Barn. The regiment also erected a monument denoting the Bliss Barn center.

14th Connecticut

Dedicated:  1884.

Location: Bliss Farm Site. Accessible via West Confederate Avenue,  North Hancock Avenue, or the Emmitsburg Road.

Description: A small stone marker that denotes the center of the Bliss farmhouse which stood at this spot during the battle. There is a Second Corps trefoil on the top of the marker.

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Hazard’s Brigade Monument (2-A)

The Second Corps’ Artillery Brigade is honored by a monument.

Hazard's Brigade, Second Corps Artillery. Gettysburg March 2010

Location: Located west side of Hancock Avenue at The Angle.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
SECOND CORPS
ARTILLERY BRIGADE
Capt. John G. Hazard
1st New York Battery B Four 10 Pounders
Lieut. Albert S. Sheldon Capt. James M. Rorty Lieut. Robert E. Rogers
1st Rhode Island Battery A Six 3 Inch Rifles
Capt. William A. Arnold
1st Rhode Island Battery B Four 12 Pounders
Lieut. T. Frederick Brown Lieut. Wm. S. Perrin
1 st U. S. Battery I Six 12 Pounders
Lieut. George A. Woodruff Lieut. Tully McCrea
4th U. S. Battery A Six 3 Inch Rifles
Lieut. Alonzo H. Cushing Sergt. Frederick Fuger

July 1. Marched from Uniontown Md. at 2 P. M. Went into position at 11 P. M. on the Taneytown Road three miles from Gettysburg.

July 2. Moved with the Corps at daylight and went into position on the Corps battle line in the order from right to left as mentioned. The batteries were engaged toward night with some loss.

July 3. Engaged with the Confederate artillery in front at 8 A. M. and along the whole line at 1 P. M. and assisted in repulsing Longstreet’s assault in the afternoon.

Casualties Killed 3 Officers 24 Men Wounded 5 Officers 114 Men Captured or Missing 3 Men Total 149

Willard’s Brigade Monument (2-3-3)

The Second Corps’ Third Division’s Third Brigade is honored by a monument.

Monument to Willard's Brigade. duplicate (20177) duplicate (20176) Gettysburg April 2011

Location: Located east side of North Hancock Avenue in Ziegler’s Grove near the Brian buildings.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
SECOND CORPS THIRD DIVISION
THIRD BRIGADE
Col. George L. Willard
Col. Eliakim Sherrill
Lieut. Col. James M. Bull
39th(4Cos.) 111th 126th New York Infantry

July 2. Took position in the morning along Cemetery Ridge at right of the Angle. Near sunset went to the left to support Third Corps. Charged Brig. Gen. Barksdale’s Brigade in the wooded swale at the head of Plum Run forcing it back and capturing many prisoners. The 39th New York recaptured Battery I 5th U. S. from the 21st Miss. Col. Willard was killed and Brig. Gen. Barksdale mortally wounded. At dark the Brigade returned and was held in reserve.

July 3. Engaged on the skirmish line with much loss. At 3 P. M. after a terrific cannonade of two hours the Brigade was moved up to the line of the Second Brigade and assisted in repulsing Longstreet’s assault in which Col. Sherrill was mortally wounded. A large detail from the Brigade under Capt. Armstrong of the 125th New York and the 8th Ohio on the skirmish line withdrew to the right and poured in a deadly fire upon the left of the assaulting lines and then charging captured prisoners and flags.

Casualties Killed 11 Officers 128 Men Wounded 26 Officers 516 Mer Captured or Missing 33 Men Total 714

Smyth’s Brigade Monument (2-3-2)

The Second Corps’ Third Division’s Second Brigade is honored by a monument.

Monument to Smyth's Brigade. Gettysburg August 2012

Location: Located east side of North Hancock Avenue near Cyclorama and Brian buildings.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit. This particular monument includes an experimental 1930s-era bird guard.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
SECOND CORPS THIRD DIVISION
SECOND BRIGADE
Col. Thomas A. Smyth
Lieut. Col. Francis E. Pierce
14th Connecticut 1st Delaware
12th New Jersey 1Oth 108th New York Infantry

July 2. Took position early in the morning along a stone fence on Cemetery Ridge at the left of Ziegler’s Grove supporting Battery I 1st U. S. on the right. Sharp skirmishing during the day and artillery firing at intervals in the afternoon. At night the line of the Brigade was extended to the Angle to cover the portion previously occupied by the Third Brigade.

July 3. In the afternoon the Bliss Barn having been occupied by the Confederate sharpshooters the 14th Conn. by order of Brig. Gen. A. Hays recaptured and burned the barn. At 1 P. M. a terrific cannonade was opened by the Confederates in front which continued for two hours followed by a charge of the Divisions of Major Gen. Pickett Brig. Gen. Pettigrew and Major Gen. Pender which was repulsed by the Brigade reinforced by the Third Brigade. More than 1200 prisoners and 9 stand of colors were captured by the Brigade.

July 4. The Brigade remained in position until the close of the battle with sharp skirmishing during the day.

Casualties Killed 6 Officers 55 Men Wounded 34 Officers 245 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 25 Men Total 366

Carroll’s Brigade Monument (2-3-1)

The Second Corps’ Third Division’s First Brigade is honored by a monument.

Monument to General Samuel Carroll's Brigade on East Cemetery Hill. Gettysburg December 2011

Location: Located east side of Baltimore Pike at East Cemetery Hill.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
SECOND CORPS THIRD DIVISION
FIRST BRIGADE
Col. Samuel S. Carroll
14th Indiana 4th 8th Ohio
7th West Virginia Infantry

July 2. Took position in the morning on right of Corps on Cemetery Ridge between the Cemetery and Battery I 1 st U. S. in Ziegler’s Grove. In the afternoon the 8th Ohio was sent on the skirmish line and remained until the close of the battle. At 7 P. M. the remainder of the Brigade occupied the place on the left made vacant by the Third Brigade going to the support of Third Corps for a short time. At dark the Brigade went to relief of Eleventh Corps and was hotly engaged in support of Batteries on East Cemetery Hill until after 10 P. M.

July 3. Sharp skirmishing continued through the day the Brigade was subjected to an annoying sharpshooters fire from the houses in the town and a cross fire from artillery from the north east and west. The 8th Ohio assisted in the repulse of Longstreet’s assault. The Brigade captured 252 prisoners and 4 stand of colors.

Casualties Killed 3 Officers 35 Men Wounded 15 Officers 151 Men Captured or Missing 7 Men Total 211

Hall’s Brigade Monument (2-2-3)

The Second Corps’ Second Division’s Third Brigade is honored by a monument.

Hall's Brigade Monument. duplicate (20325) duplicate (20324) Gettysburg April 2011

Location: East side of Hancock Avenue, south of the Copse of Trees.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
SECOND CORPS SECOND DIVISION
THIRD BRIGADE
Col. Norman J. Hall
19th 20th Massachusetts 7th Michigan
42D 59th (4 Cos.) New York Infantry

July 2. Took position on the line at the left of Second Brigade and of the copse of trees. The 19th Mass. and 42D New York were late in the day advanced to support Second Division Third Corps but retired on Second Division being forced back. The Brigade was attacked by Brig. Gen. Wright’s Brigade which overrun Battery A 1st Rhode Island then in advance but was repulsed with heavy loss and forced beyond the Emmitsburg Road.

July 3. Remained in position. At 3 P. M. Longstreet’s assault was made after a cannonade of two hours. The Brigade and the Second Brigade received the charge of Major Gen. Pickett’s Division which was repulsed with great loss in killed wounded prisoners and flags. In this engagement the First Brigade and the other troops were rushed to support of the two Brigades engaged and contributed to the victory. The Brigade remained in its position until the close of the battle.

Casualties Killed 6 Officers 75 Men Wounded 29 Officers 253 Men Captured or Missing 14 Men Total 377

Webb’s Brigade Monument (2-2-2)

The Second Corps’ Second Division’s Second Brigade is honored by a monument.

Webb's Brigade Monument.  Gettysburg February 2013

Location: East side of Hancock Avenue across from the Copse of Trees.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
SECOND CORPS SECOND DIVISION
SECOND BRIGADE
Brig. Gen. Alexander S. Webb
69th 71st 72D 106th Penna. Infantry

July 2. The 69th Penna. took position along the advanced line of the stone wall at the left of the Angle. The other regiments of the Brigade in the rear of the ridge. During the day two companies of the 71st and two of the 106th Penna. were sharply engaged on the skirmish line. About sunset Brig. Gen. Wright’s Brigade charged across the Emmitsburg Road to the Union line past the guns of Battery B 1st Rhode Island but was soon repulsed with the loss of many prisoners and forced back beyond the Emmitsburg Road. All the guns temporarily lost were retaken. At night the 71st and 106th Penna. except two companies on skirmish line were sent to the support of the Eleventh Corps on East Cemetery Hill. The former returned at midnight the latter remained.

July 3. At 3 P. M. after a heavy cannonading for two hours Major Gen. Pickett’s Division of about 5,000 men charged the line held by this and the Third Brigade breaking through the line at the Angle. Reinforcements coming up quickly the charge was repulsed with great loss. Nearly 1,000 prisoners and six battle flags were reported captured by the Brigade.

Casualties Killed 9 Officers 105 Men Wounded 27 Officers 311 men Captured or Missing 5 Officers 34 Men Total 491