Hall’s Brigade Monument (2-2-3)

The Second Corps’ Second Division’s Third Brigade is honored by a monument.

Hall's Brigade Monument. duplicate (20325) duplicate (20324) Gettysburg April 2011

Location: East side of Hancock Avenue, south of the Copse of Trees.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
SECOND CORPS SECOND DIVISION
THIRD BRIGADE
Col. Norman J. Hall
19th 20th Massachusetts 7th Michigan
42D 59th (4 Cos.) New York Infantry

July 2. Took position on the line at the left of Second Brigade and of the copse of trees. The 19th Mass. and 42D New York were late in the day advanced to support Second Division Third Corps but retired on Second Division being forced back. The Brigade was attacked by Brig. Gen. Wright’s Brigade which overrun Battery A 1st Rhode Island then in advance but was repulsed with heavy loss and forced beyond the Emmitsburg Road.

July 3. Remained in position. At 3 P. M. Longstreet’s assault was made after a cannonade of two hours. The Brigade and the Second Brigade received the charge of Major Gen. Pickett’s Division which was repulsed with great loss in killed wounded prisoners and flags. In this engagement the First Brigade and the other troops were rushed to support of the two Brigades engaged and contributed to the victory. The Brigade remained in its position until the close of the battle.

Casualties Killed 6 Officers 75 Men Wounded 29 Officers 253 Men Captured or Missing 14 Men Total 377

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Webb’s Brigade Monument (2-2-2)

The Second Corps’ Second Division’s Second Brigade is honored by a monument.

Webb's Brigade Monument.  Gettysburg February 2013

Location: East side of Hancock Avenue across from the Copse of Trees.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
SECOND CORPS SECOND DIVISION
SECOND BRIGADE
Brig. Gen. Alexander S. Webb
69th 71st 72D 106th Penna. Infantry

July 2. The 69th Penna. took position along the advanced line of the stone wall at the left of the Angle. The other regiments of the Brigade in the rear of the ridge. During the day two companies of the 71st and two of the 106th Penna. were sharply engaged on the skirmish line. About sunset Brig. Gen. Wright’s Brigade charged across the Emmitsburg Road to the Union line past the guns of Battery B 1st Rhode Island but was soon repulsed with the loss of many prisoners and forced back beyond the Emmitsburg Road. All the guns temporarily lost were retaken. At night the 71st and 106th Penna. except two companies on skirmish line were sent to the support of the Eleventh Corps on East Cemetery Hill. The former returned at midnight the latter remained.

July 3. At 3 P. M. after a heavy cannonading for two hours Major Gen. Pickett’s Division of about 5,000 men charged the line held by this and the Third Brigade breaking through the line at the Angle. Reinforcements coming up quickly the charge was repulsed with great loss. Nearly 1,000 prisoners and six battle flags were reported captured by the Brigade.

Casualties Killed 9 Officers 105 Men Wounded 27 Officers 311 men Captured or Missing 5 Officers 34 Men Total 491

Harrow’s Brigade Monument (2-2-1)

The Second Corps’ Second Division’s First Brigade is honored by a monument.

harrow's brigade Gettysburg September 2010

Location: West side of Hancock Avenue, along route of old south loop of Hancock Avenue.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
SECOND CORPS SECOND DIVISION
FIRST BRIGADE
Brig. Gen. William Harrow
Col. Francis E. Heath
19th Maine 15th Massachusetts
1st Minnesota 82D New York Infantry

July 2. Early in the morning took position in the rear of Second and Third Brigades. The 15th Mass. and 82D New York were advanced to the Emmitsburg Road on the right of Cordori House to support Third Corps the other two regiments were moved to the left on a line with the Third Brigade. The Third Corps having been forced back the advanced regiments were compelled to retire to the main line by Brig. Gen. Wright’s Brigade which captured several pieces of artillery but supports coming quickly to the Union line they forced the Confederates back across the Emmitsburg Road with heavy loss and retook the captured artillery Col. C. H. Ward 15th Mass. and Col. J. J. Huston 82D New York were mortally wounded.

July 3. At 1 P. M. a terrific cannonade was opened along the Confederate line in front which continued for about two hours followed by a charge of over 15,000 infantry its right striking Second and Third Brigades. This Brigade moved at once to the right and assisted the other two Brigades in repelling the assault and capturing a large number of prisoners and several flags.

Casualties Killed 10 Officers 137 Men Wounded 46 Officers 527 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 47 Men Total 768

106th Pennsylvania Infantry (Position Marker)

The 106th Pennsylvania Infantry served as members of Webb’s Philadelphia Brigade in Gibbon’s Division of the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments and a position marker.

106th pennsylvania Gettysburg February 2009

Dedicated: 1888.

Location: East Cemetery Hill. Marker is on the north side of East Cemetery Hill.

Description: Position marker is 2.6×1.3 foot and 3.3 foot high.

106th Pennsylvania Infantry (Second Monument)

The 106th Pennsylvania Infantry served as members of Webb’s Philadelphia Brigade in Gibbon’s Division of the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments and a position marker.

Monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry. Gettysburg June 2012

Dedicated: 1884

Location: Codori House. Located on the east side of Emmitsburg Road next to the Codori farmhouse. It was moved to this location in 1889.

Description: The monument is inscribed on all sizes and includes a history of the unit’s different movements and actions at Gettysburg. Originally stood where the regimental monument is now located. Monument has a three-part stepped granite shaft with a flat top set on a four foot square rough cut base. The lower two parts of the shaft are smooth cut while the upper part is polished stone with incised inscriptions on all sides. Overall height is 8 feet. Monument includes commemorative era picket and rail fencing.

106th Pennsylvania Infantry

The 106th Pennsylvania Infantry served as members of Webb’s Philadelphia Brigade in Gibbon’s Division of the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments and a position marker.

Monument to the 106th Pennsylvania Infantry. Gettysburg May 2010

Dedicated: Sept. 11, 1889.

Location: Monument located on the west side of Hancock Avenue at the Copse of Trees. Indicates the advance position of the regiment on July 3, 1863.

Description: Tiered, rough-hewn and polished monument contains two reliefs on the front and back and is topped with sculptural elements. The front relief is the Seal of the State of Pennsylvania and the rear relief depicts the Gettysburg engagement. The piece is topped with a trio of snare drums arranged on their sides in a pyramid shape surrounded on each side by a knapsack. The Corps insignia is found on all four sides. Monument is a three-part granite shaft topped with haversacks and drums and set on a 5.11 foot square base. The shaft has a bronze tablet and bas-relief. Overall height 12.4 feet. Flanking markers are ten inches square.

72nd Pennsylvania Infantry (Secondary Monument)

The 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry served as members of Webb’s Philadelphia Brigade in Gibbon’s Division of the Second Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments.

Monument to the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry at the Angle. Gettysburg June 2012

Dedicated: August 27, 1883

Location: Located at the junction of the former Webb Avenue and Hancock Avenue.

Description: It was erected by the surviving members of the 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry, Philadelphia Brigade in memory of their deceased members. The sculpture indicates the position held by the 72nd Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Brigade on July 3, 1863, where they stood in line and fired volleys into Armistead’s line as he advanced across the angle wall. Monument is a two-part granite shaft with a two-part chamfered back and set on a 5.10×4 foot base. The shaft has a combination of finished and rough cut tooling with a zinc tablet in the center front. Overall height is 6.8 feet.