Nelson’s Battalion Monument

Nelson’s Battalion of the Artillery Reserve of Ewell’s Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia is honored by a monument.

Nelson's Battalion Gettysburg May 2009

Dedicated: December 19, 1910.

Location: Benner’s Hill, north of the Hanover Road.

Description: One of 64 Confederate brigade monuments.  Monolith consisting of polished smooth red Maine granite pedestal with a circular base. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit. Erected by the U.S. War Department and designed by E.B. Cope. They indicate the general location of the centers of the various Confederate brigades and artillery battalions during several phases of the battle. Bronze from melted Civil War cannons was used to create many of the inscription tablets.

Inscription:

C. S. A.
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
EWELL’S CORPS ARTILLERY RESERVE
NELSON’S BATTALION
Kirkpatrick’s Massie’s and Milledge’s Batteries

One 10 Pounder Parrott Four 3 Inch Rifles Six Napoleons

July 1 The Battalion arrived on the field too late to participate in the engagement of the day. Was ordered to report to the Chief of Artillery Rodes’ Division.

July 2. Took position on Seminary Ridge 1/4 mile north of Chambersburg Pike. About 11 A. M. moved to the rear of Pennsylvania College and remained until night when the Battalion returned to the position of the morning.

July 3. Ordered to the extreme left of the Confederate line to find a position to withdraw the fire from the Confederate infantry. Opened about 12 M. firing 20 to 25 rounds. At midnight moved with Johnson’s Division to Seminary Ridge.

July 4. Was ordered to take position on the ridge west of town. At night took up the line of march to Hagerstown.

Ammunition expended 48 rounds. Casualties not reported.

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Dance’s Battalion Monument

Dance’s Battalion of the Artillery Reserve of Ewell’s Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia is honored by a monument.

Dance's Battalion Gettysburg December 2009

Dedicated: December 19, 1910.

Location: West side of Confederate Avenue, North of Fairfield Road on Seminary grounds.

Description: One of 64 Confederate brigade monuments.  Monolith consisting of polished smooth red Maine granite pedestal with a circular base. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit. Erected by the U.S. War Department and designed by E.B. Cope. They indicate the general location of the centers of the various Confederate brigades and artillery battalions during several phases of the battle. Bronze from melted Civil War cannons was used to create many of the inscription tablets.

Inscription:

C. S. A.
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
EWELL’S CORPS ARTILLERY RESERVE
DANCE’S BATTALION
FIRST VIRGINIA ARTILLERY
Cunningham’s Smith’s Watson’s Griffin’s and Graham’s Batteries
Four 20 Pounder Parrotts Four 10 Pounder Parrotts
Ten 3 Inch Rifles Two Napoleons

July 1. The Battalion reached the field in evening too late to take part in the battle.

July 2 & 3. The four first named batteries occupied positions at various points on this ridge. Graham’s Battery of 20 Pounder Parrotts served east of Rock Creek. All were actively engaged.

July 4. At nightfall began the march to Hagerstown.

Losses Killed 3 Wounded 19

Ammunition expended 1888 rounds.

 

Carter’s Battalion Monument

Carter’s Battalion of Rodes’ Division of Ewell’s Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia is honored by a monument.

Carter's Battalion

Dedicated: December 19, 1910.

Location: Northeast side of North Confederate Avenue southeast of the Eternal Peace Memorial.

Description: One of 64 Confederate brigade monuments.  Monolith consisting of polished smooth red Maine granite pedestal with a circular base. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit. Erected by the U.S. War Department and designed by E.B. Cope. They indicate the general location of the centers of the various Confederate brigades and artillery battalions during several phases of the battle. Bronze from melted Civil War cannons was used to create many of the inscription tablets.

Inscription:

C. S. A.
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
EWELL’S CORPS RODES’ DIVISION
CARTER’S BATTALION
Carter’s Fry’s Page’s and Reese’s Batteries
Four 10 Pounder Parrotts Six 3 lnch Rifles Six Napoleons

July 1. Arrived on the field soon after noon and rendered very effective service in the day’s battle.

July 2. Held in readiness for action but was not engaged.

July 3. The Parrotts and Rifled guns were placed on Seminary Ridge near the railroad cut and took part in the great cannonade preceding Longstreet’s assault.

July 4. After nightfall began the march to Hagerstown.

Losses Killed 6 Wounded 35 Missing 24 Total 65

Ammunition expended 1898 rounds.

Ramseur’s Brigade Monument

Ramseur’s Brigade of Rodes’ Division of Ewell’s Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia is honored by a monument.

Ramseur's Brigade Monument. Gettysburg March 2012

Dedicated: December 19, 1910.

Location: North side of North Confederate Avenue.

Description: One of 64 Confederate brigade monuments.  Monolith consisting of polished smooth red Maine granite pedestal with a circular base. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit. Erected by the U.S. War Department and designed by E.B. Cope. They indicate the general location of the centers of the various Confederate brigades and artillery battalions during several phases of the battle. Bronze from melted Civil War cannons was used to create many of the inscription tablets.

Inscription:

C. S. A.
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
EWELL’S CORPS RODES’ DIVISION
RAMSEUR’S BRIGADE
2nd 4th 14th 30th North Carolina Infantry

July 1. Soon after Iverson’s and O’Neal’s Brigades had each suffered the repulse of three regiments with heavy losses Ramseur’s Brigade moved from its position here and vigorously assailed the right wing of the Union forces. The 14th and 30th Regiments with O’Neal’s 3rd Alabama turned the flank of the Union troops while the 2nd and 4th Regiments together with Doles’ Brigade and part of O’Neal’s struck them in the rear. A struggle ensued in which both sides suffered severely and the conflict here only ended with the retreat of the Union Corps from Seminary Ridge. In that retreat the Brigade made active pursuit and captured many prisoners.

July 2. Skirmishing on the southern borders of the town.

July 3. In sunken lane southwest of town.

July 4. In line on Seminary Ridge. At night began the march to Hagerstown.

Present 1909 Killed 23 Wounded 129 Missing 44

O’Neal’s Brigade Monument (Culp’s Hill)

O’Neal’s Brigade of Rodes’ Division of Ewell’s Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia is honored by two monuments.

O'Neal's Brigade Gettysburg February 2009

Location: East Confederate Avenue, east slope of Culp’s Hill. Located on East side of East Confederate Avenue, in woods below Culp’s Hill and near Rock Creek.

Description: One of 64 Confederate brigade monuments.  Monolith consisting of polished smooth red Maine granite pedestal with a circular base. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit. Erected by the U.S. War Department and designed by E.B. Cope. They indicate the general location of the centers of the various Confederate brigades and artillery battalions during several phases of the battle. Bronze from melted Civil War cannons was used to create many of the inscription tablets.

Inscription:

C. S. A.
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
EWELL’S CORPS RODES’ DIVISION
ONEAL’S BRIGADE
3rd 5th 6th 12th 26th Alabama Infantry

July 3. After taking part in the battle of the First and Second Days elsewhere on the field the Brigade leaving the 5th Regiment on guard marched at 2 A. M. from its position in town to Culp’s Hill to reinforce Johnson’s Division. Arrived at daybreak and was soon under fire but not actively engaged until 8 A. M. when it advanced against breastworks on the eastern slope of the main summit of the Hill gaining there a position near the Union works and holding it under a terrific fire for three hours until withdrawn by Gen. Johnson with his entire line to the base of the hill near the creek. From thence it moved during the night to Seminary Ridge west of the town and rejoined Rodes’ Division.

July 4. Occupied Seminary Ridge. Late at night began the march to Hagerstown.

Present 1650 Killed 73 Wounded 430 Missing 193 Total 696

O’Neal’s Brigade Monument (Oak Hill)

O’Neal’s Brigade of Rodes’ Division of Ewell’s Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia is honored by two monuments.

Monument to O'Neal's Brigade. Gettysburg June 2012

Dedicated: December 19, 1910.

Location: West side of North Confederate Avenue, southeast of the Peace Light Monument.

Description: One of 64 Confederate brigade monuments.  Monolith consisting of polished smooth red Maine granite pedestal with a circular base. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit. Erected by the U.S. War Department and designed by E.B. Cope. They indicate the general location of the centers of the various Confederate brigades and artillery battalions during several phases of the battle. Bronze from melted Civil War cannons was used to create many of the inscription tablets.

Inscription:

C. S. A.
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
EWELL’S CORPS RODES’ DIVISION
ONEAL’S BRIGADE
3rd 5th 6th 12th 26th Alabama Infantry

July 1. Soon after arriving at this position three regiments attacked the Union flank, the 5th Regiment being ordered to guard the wide interval between the Brigade and Doles’s Brigade in the valley on the left and the 3rd Regiment joining Daniel’s and afterwards Ramseur’s Brigade. The three regiments were repulsed with heavy loss but the entire Brigade took part in the general attack soon made by the Confederates which finally dislodged the Union forces from Seminary Ridge.

July 2. The Brigade in position all day in or near the town but not engaged.

July 3. The 5th Regiment lay in the southern borders of the town firing upon the Union artillery with their long range rifles. The other regiments moved to Culp’s Hill to reinforce Johnson’s Division.

July 4. Moved to Seminary Ridge. At night began the march to Hagerstown.

Present 1794 Killed 73 Wounded 430 Missing 193 Total 696

Iverson’s Brigade Monument

Iverson’s Brigade of Rodes’ Division of Ewell’s Second Corps, Army of Northern Virginia is honored by a monument.

Iverson's Brigade Monument. Gettysburg March 2012

Dedicated: December 19, 1910.

Location: Northeast side of North Confederate Avenue.

Description: One of 64 Confederate brigade monuments.  Monolith consisting of polished smooth red Maine granite pedestal with a circular base. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit. Erected by the U.S. War Department and designed by E.B. Cope. They indicate the general location of the centers of the various Confederate brigades and artillery battalions during several phases of the battle. Bronze from melted Civil War cannons was used to create many of the inscription tablets.

Inscription:

C. S. A.
ARMY OF NORTHERN VIRGINIA
EWELL’S CORPS RODES’ DIVISION
IVERSON’S BRIGADE
5th 12th 20th 23rd North Carolina Infantry

July 1. The Brigade was one of the first of the Division in the battle. It advanced against the Union line posted behind stone fence east of Forney Field. Its right being assailed by 2nd Brigade First Corps and its left exposed by the repulse of O’Neal a vigorous assault by Union forces in front and on left flank almost annihilated three regiments. The 12th Regiment on the right being sheltered by the knoll suffered slight loss and the remnants of the others joined Ramseur’s Brigade and served with it throughout the battle.

July 2. Lay all day in the town. At dusk moved to aid in an attack on Cemetery Hill but two of Early’s Brigades having been repulsed the Brigade withdrew.

July 3. With other brigades in the sunken road southwest of town. At night withdrew to Seminary Ridge.

July 4. Marched at 2 P. M. as wagon train guard on road to Hagerstown.

Present 1470 Killed 130 Wounded 382 Missing 308 Total 820