2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac Tablet

The 2nd Division of the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac is honored by a monument and an iron tablet.

Position 2nd Division Cavalry Corps Gettysburg September 2009

Dedicated: 1900-1901.

Location: Located junction of Hanover Road and Hoffman Road.

Description: Marks approximate center of division as it contested part of “stonewall” Brigade during afternoon of July 2. Painted aluminum tablet, 2’6″x1’7″. All 3’6″ H.

Inscription:

Units of the Union Second Cavalry Division, commanded by Brig. Gen. D.M. Gregg, were engaged here with a portion of the Confederate “Stonewall” Brigade, Johnston’s Division, from about 6 to 10 p.m. on July 2, 1863. The 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry occupied the ground to the right, the 1st New Jersey Cavalry and Company A, Purnell (Maryland) Legion to the left, the 10th New York Cavalry and a section of Battery H, 3rd Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery were in support.

On July 3, the 16th Pennsylvania Cavalry of Gregg’s Division was formed here in a skirmish line which connected on the left with infantry units on Wolf’s Hill and on the right with Brig. Gen. George Custer’s Cavalry Brigade.

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Pickett’s and McLaws Division, Longstreet’s Corps Tablet

Pickett’s and McLaws’ Divisions are honored by an iron tablet.

Army of Northern Virginia Longstreet's Corps McLaws's and Pickett's Divisions  July 1 McLaws's Division arrived late in the day and camped in this vicinity.  July 2 In the morning McLaws's Division moved on the road towards Gettysburg but turning to the right half mile this side of Willoughby Run and crossing that stream lower down formed line as marked on the Battlefield. Pickett's Division marched by this place in the afternoon but followed the other road with some deflections to avoid being seen by the Union Signal Corps and crossing Willoughby Run lay that night in the west side of Spangler's Woods. Gettysburg September 2009

Dedicated: 1907.

Location: Located West of Gettysburg, on North side of Fairfield Road at Black Horse Tavern.

Description: Marks position of McLaw’s and Pickett’s Division on July 1 & 2. Cast iron tablet with raised inscription painted in contrasting color, mounted on fluted cast iron post. 4’4″ high; tablet 3.8 x 3.4 feet; inscription narrates events associated with Division during Battle. Cast by C. Gilbert.

Inscription:

Army of Northern Virginia
Longstreet’s Corps
McLaws’s and Pickett’s Divisions

July 1 McLaws’s Division arrived late in the day and camped in this vicinity.

July 2 In the morning McLaws’s Division moved on the road towards Gettysburg but turning to the right half mile this side of Willoughby Run and crossing that stream lower down formed line as marked on the Battlefield. Pickett’s Division marched by this place in the afternoon but followed the other road with some deflections to avoid being seen by the Union Signal Corps and crossing Willoughby Run lay that night in the west side of Spangler’s Woods.

 

3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac Monument

The monument to the 3rd Division of the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac.

Kilpatrick's Division Monument. Gettysburg December 2011

Dedicated: 1910.

Location: South Confederate Avenue, Bushman Woods.

Description: One of 22 Union division monuments that describe the movements and itinerary of each division of the Army of the Potomac. Designed by E. B. Cope and erected by the U.S. War Department. Concrete foundation, Winnsboro (South Carolina) granite monument, bronze inscription tablet. Seven foot tall monolith.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
CAVALRY CORPS
THIRD DIVISION
Brig. General Judson Kilpatrick

First Brigade Brig. Gen. Elon J. Farnsworth
Col. Nathaniel R Richmond
Second Brigade Brig. General George A. Custer
Headquarters Guard,
Co. C 1st Ohio Capt. S. N. Stanford

June 30. The First Brigade was attacked by Stuart’s Confederate Cavalry at Hanover and was repulsed.

July 1. Marched to Berlin to intercept Stuart without success.

July 2. Arrived on the field of Gettysburg at 2 P. M. Moved over the road from Gettysburg to Abbottstown and was attacked at sundown near Hunterstown by Stuart’s Cavalry which was driven from the field after an engagement of two hours.

July 3. Moved to attack the Confederate right and rear. The Second Brigade reported to Gen. Gregg and was engaged on the extreme right. Gen. Farnsworth arrived on the extreme left at 1 P. M. and became engaged with the Confederate skirmishers and was supported by the Reserve Brigade on his left. About 5.30 P. M. the First and Reserve Brigades advanced Gen. Farnsworth with the 1st West Virginia and 18th Pennsylvania through woods and across stone walls occupied by superior forces of Confederate infantry and artillery and was repulsed with heavy loss and Gen. Farnsworth killed.

July 4. Moved to Emmitsburg.

Casualties Killed 4 Officers 49 Men Wounded 19 Officers 162 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 120 Men Total 355

2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac Monument

The monument to the 2nd Division of the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac.

Monument to Gregg's Cavalry Division. Gregg's division Gettysburg June 2012

Dedicated: 1910.

Location: Located south side of Gregg Avenue, East Cavalry Field.

Description: One of 22 Union division monuments that describe the movements and itinerary of each division of the Army of the Potomac. Designed by E. B. Cope and erected by the U.S. War Department. Concrete foundation, Winnsboro (South Carolina) granite monument, bronze inscription tablet. Seven foot tall monolith.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
CAVALRY CORPS
SECOND DIVISION
Brig. General David McM. Gregg

First Brigade Col. John B. McIntosh
Second Brigade Col. Pennock Huey
Third Brigade Col. J. Irvin Gregg

July 2. Gen. Gregg with two Brigades left Hanover and took position about noon at the junction of the Hanover Road with the Low Dutch Road First Brigade on the right Third on the left connecting with the infantry pickets (the Second Brigade having been sent to Westminster). Took and held Brinkerhoff Ridge after a sharp skirmish with the 2D Virginia Infantry About 10 P. M. the two Brigades withdrew and bivouacked for the night on the Baltimore Pike a mile East of Rock Creek Bridge.

July 3. Took position with the right on Hanover Road. The Second Brigade Third Cavalry Division on the right. Gen. Custer having received an order from Gen. Pleasonton to rejoin his Division was relieved about 2 P. M. by the First Brigade. A large force of Confederate Cavalry under Gen. Stuart screened from view by woods having been discovered Gen. Gregg ordered Custer to remain in support of McIntosh until Confederate Cavalry could be driven back. Custer and McIntosh and the Batteries of Randol and Pennington were soon hotly engaged with the Confederate Cavalry and Artillery. About 3 P. M. Stuart made a charge with his reserves under Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee which was repulsed.This closed operations on the field.

Casualties Killed 6 Men Wounded 7 Officers 31 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 11 Men Total 56

1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac Monument

The monument to the 1st Division of the Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac.

Monument to Buford's Division. Gettysburg December 2011

Dedicated: 1910.

Location: Located on east side of South Reynolds Avenue.

Description: One of 22 Union division monuments that describe the movements and itinerary of each division of the Army of the Potomac. Designed by E. B. Cope and erected by the U.S. War Department. Concrete foundation, Winnsboro (South Carolina) granite monument, bronze inscription tablet. Seven foot tall monolith.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
CAVALRY CORPS
FIRST DIVISION
Brig. Gen. John Buford

First Brigade Col. Wm. Gamble
Second Brigade Col. Thos. C. Devin
Reserve Brigade Brig. Gen. Wesley Merritt

June 29. Engaged in picketing scouting and patrolling westerly and northerly to Hagerstown. Finding no Confederate force Gen. Buford with the First and Second Brigades recrossed the mountains and encamped near Fairfield.

June 30. Arrived at Gettysburg at 11 A. M. as a detachment of Heth’s Confederate Division was about to enter but withdrew on the approach of the two Brigades of the Division. Gen. Buford deployed his Cavalry along the ridge east of Willoughby Run between the Mummasburg and Fairfield Roads with pickets well advanced.

July 1. Was attacked between 8 and 9 A. M. by Heth’s Division and Pegram’s Artillery Battalion which were held in check until the arrival of First Corps. The Second Brigade picketed the approaches from the north and retarded the advance of Ewell’s Corps until Eleventh Corps arrived. About 4 P. M. retreated to Cemetery Hill and formed on left of town and bivouacked for the night in front of Little Round Top.

July 3. Started in the morning for Westminster to guard Army trains. The Reserve Brigade Cavalry Corps arrived about noon on the Emmitsburg Road and engaged for four hours the Confederate right.

Casualties Killed 1 Officer 27 Men Wounded 12 Officers 104 Men Captured or Missing 6 Officers 268 Men Total 418

2nd Division, 12th Corps, Army of the Potomac Monument

The monument to the 2nd Division of the 12th Corps, Army of the Potomac.

geary's division Gettysburg February 2009

Dedicated: 1910.

Location: Located west side of South Slocum Avenue, near Geary and Williams Avenues.

Description: One of 22 Union division monuments that describe the movements and itinerary of each division of the Army of the Potomac. Designed by E. B. Cope and erected by the U.S. War Department. Concrete foundation, Winnsboro (South Carolina) granite monument, bronze inscription tablet. Seven foot tall monolith.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
TWELFTH CORPS
SECOND DIVISION
Brig. General John W. Geary

First Brigade Col. Charles Candy
Second Brigade Col. Geo. A. Cobham Jr.
Brig. Thos. L. Kane
Third Brigade Brig. Gen. Geo. S. Greene

July 1. Arrived on the Baltimore Pike and went into position about 5 P. M. the First and Third Brigades on the line from Cemetery Ridge to Little Round Top Second Brigade on the left of Baltimore Pike.

July 2. In the morning the First and Third Brigades took position on the right of First Corps on Culp’s Hill connecting with First Division on the right Breastworks were thrown up along the entire front. At 7 P. M. the First and Third Brigades on the Baltimore Pike moved off intending to support Third Corps. Brig. Gen. Greene extended the Third Brigade over the line of the Second Brigade refusing his right. Being reinforced by about 750 men from the left he held his position against the attacks of Johnson’s Confederate Division.

July 3. At 3 A. M. an attack by infantry and artillery was made on Johnson’s Division and after a contest of seven hours the Confederate forces were driven from their position losing heavily in killed wounded and prisoners also three battleflags and over 5,000 small arms.

Casualties Killed 12 Officers 96 Men Wounded 16 Officers 381 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 34 Men Total 540

1st Division, 12th Corps, Army of the Potomac Monument

The monument to the 1st Division of the 12th Corps, Army of the Potomac.

Williams Division Gettysburg December 2009

Dedicated: 1910.

Location: South Slocum Avenue, Culp’s Hill.

Description: One of 22 Union division monuments that describe the movements and itinerary of each division of the Army of the Potomac. Designed by E. B. Cope and erected by the U.S. War Department. Concrete foundation, Winnsboro (South Carolina) granite monument, bronze inscription tablet. Seven foot tall monolith.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
TWELFTH CORPS
FIRST DIVISION
Brig. General Alpheus S. Williams Brig. General Thos. H. Ruger

First Brigade Col. Archibald L. McDougall
Second Brigade Brig. Gen. Henry H. Lockwood
Third Brigade Brig. Gen. Thos. H. Ruger
Col. Silas Colgrove

July 1. Approaching Rock Creek on the Baltimore Pike the Division moved on a cross road to occupy Wolf Hill but retired at sunset and took position east of Rock Creek for the night. The First and Sixth Corps having been included in Gen. Slocum’s command Gen. Williams assumed command of the Corps. Gen. Ruger of the First Division and Col. S. Colgrove of the Third Brigade.

July 2. Brig. Gen. Lockwood’s Brigade joined the Corps early in the morning not having been assigned to a division was subject to the direct orders of the Corps Commander until assigned July 5th to First Division. The Division at 8 A. M. crossed Rock Creek and formed on the right of Second Division its left on Culp’s Hill the right in McAllister’s Woods. Breastworks were constructed along the line. Late in the day the Division moved to support Third Corps and Johnson’s Confederate Division advanced and occupied the vacant works.

July 3. At daylight attacked the Confederate Infantry and was hotly engaged with charges and countercharges at different points until 10:30 A. M. when the Confederate forces retired.

July 4. Early in the morning Gen. Slocum with a detachment of infantry and a battery made a reconnaissance in front to Gettysburg without opposition.