Vincent’s Brigade Monument (5-1-3)

The Fifth Corps’ First Division’s Third Brigade is honored by a monument.

Monument to Vincent's Brigade. Gettysburg December 2011

Location: West side of Sykes Avenue, south slope of Little Round Top.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
FIFTH CORPS FIRST DIVISION
THIRD BRIGADE
Col. Strong Vincent Col. James C. Rice
20th Maine 16th Michigan 44th New York
83D Pennsylvania Infantry

July 2. After 4 P. M. moved with the Division left in front to the support of the Third Corps line. The Brigade was detached and took position on Little Round Top advancing to the crests at the south and southwest. The 20th Maine 83D Penna. 44th New York and 16th Michigan took position from left to right. They were immediately attacked by Brig. Gen. Law’s Brigade and the contest raged for over two hours and until dark when the attack was repulsed with great loss in killed wounded and prisoners. Over 500 prisoners including 15 commissioned officers were captured. The 20th Maine and the 83D Penna. extended their lines after dark to the summit of Round Top.

July 3. Took position about noon with Second Brigade near the left centre of the main line of battle and remained in reserve through the day exposed to severe shelling but without loss.

July 4. Made a reconnaissance to the front without finding any Confederate forces in positions occupied by them the previous day.

Casualties Killed 6 Officers 83 Men Wounded 17 Officers 236 Men Captured or Missing 11 Men Total 353

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Sweitzer’s Brigade Monument (5-1-2)

The Fifth Corps’ First Division’s Second Brigade is honored by a monument.

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC FIFTH CORPS FIRST DIVISION SECOND BRIGADE Col. Jacob B. Sweitzer 9th 32D Massachusetts 4th Michigan 62D Pennsylvania Infantry  July 2. After 2 P. M. moved from the Baltimore Pike near Rock Creek with the Division left in front to support of Third Corps line. Third Brigade was detached to occupy Little Round Top and the Brigade crossed Plum Run followed by First Brigade and went into position on the edge of woods west of the Wheatfield facing partly towards the Rose House First Brigade on the right. Brig. Gen. Kershaw’s Brigade supported by Brig. Gen. Semmes’ Brigade having attacked this position and First Brigade having retired the Brigade retired across the Wheatfield Road and formed on the north side of the woods facing the road when by order of Brig. Gen. J. Barnes the Brigade advanced to the support of First Division Second Corps and engaged Brig. Gen. Anderson’s Brigade at the stone wall at the south end of the Wheatfield but the supports on the right having given away the Brigade was attacked on the right and rear and it retired under a heavy fire to a line north of Little Round Top and there remained until the close of the battle.  Casualties Killed 6 Officers 61 Men Wounded 26 Officers 213 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 120 Men Total 427 original (17747) Gettysburg September 2010

Location: South side of DeTrobriand Avenue near the Wheatfield.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
FIFTH CORPS FIRST DIVISION
SECOND BRIGADE
Col. Jacob B. Sweitzer
9th 32D Massachusetts 4th Michigan
62D Pennsylvania Infantry

July 2. After 2 P. M. moved from the Baltimore Pike near Rock Creek with the Division left in front to support of Third Corps line. Third Brigade was detached to occupy Little Round Top and the Brigade crossed Plum Run followed by First Brigade and went into position on the edge of woods west of the Wheatfield facing partly towards the Rose House First Brigade on the right. Brig. Gen. Kershaw’s Brigade supported by Brig. Gen. Semmes’ Brigade having attacked this position and First Brigade having retired the Brigade retired across the Wheatfield Road and formed on the north side of the woods facing the road when by order of Brig. Gen. J. Barnes the Brigade advanced to the support of First Division Second Corps and engaged Brig. Gen. Anderson’s Brigade at the stone wall at the south end of the Wheatfield but the supports on the right having given away the Brigade was attacked on the right and rear and it retired under a heavy fire to a line north of Little Round Top and there remained until the close of the battle.

Casualties Killed 6 Officers 61 Men Wounded 26 Officers 213 Men Captured or Missing 1 Officer 120 Men Total 427

Tilton’s Brigade Monument (5-1-1)

The Fifth Corps’ First Division’s First Brigade is honored by a monument.

tilton's brigade

Location: Sickles Avenue at the Loop. Monument faces west.

Description: Erected 1912. One of 74 Union brigade monuments erected at Gettysburg by the United States War Department to describe the movements and itinerary of each Union brigade of the Army of the Potomac. The monuments were designed by E.B. Cope. Many of the inscription tablets were made of bronze melted down from Civil War cannons. The pedestal consists of sea-green granite with a square base. Base tapers to a smaller dimension at the tablet. On each pedestal is mounted a bronze inscription tablet describing the movements and actions of the unit.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
FIFTH CORPS FIRST DIVISION
FIRST BRIGADE
Col. William S. Tilton
18th 22D Massachusetts 1st Michigan
118th Pennsylvania Infantry

July 2. In position in column with the Division and Corps on the Baltimore Pike near Rock Creek until after 4 P. M. then moved with the Division left in front to the support of Third Corps line the Third Brigade having been detached to occupy Little Round Top. The Brigade preceded by Second Brigade crossed Plum Run and the Wheatfield and went into position on the high ground on the edge of woods facing westerly and southerly toward the Rose House Second Brigade on the left. The Brigade was sharply attacked by Brig. Gen. Kershaw’s Brigade and in compliance with orders from Brig. Gen. J. Barnes it retired to the rear and right to the woods across the Wheatfield Road and later to a line extending northerly from Little Round Top.

July 3. Relieved Third Brigade on Little Round Top.

July 4. Remained in position until close of battle except a reconnaissance in front.

Casualties Killed 2 Officers 10 Men Wounded 12 Officers 90 Men Captured or Missing 11 Men Total 125

118th Pennsylvania Infantry (Position Marker)

The 118th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment served as members of Tilton’s Brigade in Barnes’ Division of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments and a position stone.

118th Pennsylvania Gettysburg October 2007

Location: Wheatfield Road.

Description: Denotes the second position of the 118th Pennsylvania Volunteers. Erected in 1886. Monument marks where Captain Davis of the regiment fell. Base 4’x2’9″, shaft 3’2″x2′, 5’4″ high.

118th Pennsylvania Infantry (Second Monument)

The 118th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment served as members of Tilton’s Brigade in Barnes’ Division of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monuments and a position stone.

Monument to the 118th Pennsylvania Infantry on Big Round Top. Gettysburg February 2012

Dedicated: September 8, 1884.

Location: Big Round Top. Located on the northwest slope of Big Round Top along the old War Department trail to the summit. Can be accessed by walking behind the 9th Massachusetts Monument, or taking a single-track trail along the stonewall as you approach the summit.

Description: Granite monument decorated on front with relief of Maltese cross and shocks of corn, and at top capped with sculpture of a knapsack propped against cannon balls. Overall height is eight foot.

118th Pennsylvania Infantry

The 118th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment served as members of Tilton’s Brigade in Barnes’ Division of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by two monument and a position stone.

Monument to the 118th Pennsylvania Infantry. Gettysburg March 2012

Dedicated: September 12, 1889.

Location: West side of Sickles Avenue at curve of the Loop. It indicates the position held by the 118th Pennsylvania Infantry to the right of the brigade line on the afternoon of July 2, 1863 as it sustained attacks by Kershaw’s brigade.

Description: Full-length uniformed infantryman stands atop a tapered pedestal and rough-hewn base. The figure holds his rifle vertically, with both hands around the barrel and the butt at his proper left foot. There is a bronze State Seal relief on the front of the pedestal, above the Maltese cross corps insignia. Corn stalks are also included, denoting the regiment’s history as the “Philadelphia Corn Exchange Regiment.” Flank markers, 1′x1′x1’5″.

83rd Pennsylvania Infantry

The 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment served as members of Vincent’s Brigade in Barnes’ Division of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac. The regiment is honored by a monument.

Monument to the 83rd Pennsylvania Infantry. Gettysburg March 2012

Dedicated: September 12, 1889.

Location: Located on the south slope of Little Round Top. The memorial marks the general site of the position held by the 83rd Pennsylvania infantry on the evening of July 2, 1863 when attacked by Law’s Brigade.

Description: Full-length portrait of Col. Strong Vincent, dressed in military uniform, grasping the sword at his proper left side. He stands atop a tiered base with polished granite panels and bronze Maltese Cross. Monument that has two flanking markers. Flanking markers are cross-gable topped, 1.8×1.4 foot.