Right Flank of the Army of the Potomac

The right flank of the Army of the Potomac is marked by an iron tablet.

The Right of the Army of the Potomac, Infantry Monument. Right Flank Army of the Potomac Gettysburg May 2010

Dedicated: 1901.

Location: Located at South end of Neill Avenue on the summit of Wolf Hill.

Description: Denotes the location of the right flank of the Army of the Potomac on Wolf’s Hill. Marker is a cast-iron tablet on an iron post with a silver painted border and an incised inscription Right of the Infantry of the Army of the Potomac.” Overall height is 2.10 feet. Designed by E. B. Cope. Inscription “Right of the Infantry of the Army of the Potomac.” Tablet cast by Calvin Gilbert, founder.

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Right Flank of the Army of Northern Virginia

The right flank of the Army of Northern Virginia is marked by an iron tablet.

Right fla Army of Northern Virginia Right Flank Gettysburg June 2012

Dedicated: 1901.

Location: South Confederate Avenue.

Description: Marks the right flank of the general infantry line of the Army of Northern Virginia during the Battle of Gettysburg. Painted cast iron tablet, 2’9″x1’8″, on granite shaft base, 2’10” high. Cast by C. Gilbert.

Cavalry Corps Army of the Potomac Field Hospital Monument

The Army of the Potomac’s Cavalry Corps field hospital is honored by a monument.

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FIELD HOSPITALS CAVALRY CORPS The hospitals of the First Division Cavalry Corps were located June 30th in this church and other nearby buildings and fell into the hands of the Confederates on the evening of July 1st. The wounded of the cavalry commands were later cared for here and in the hospitals of the infantry divisions. Medical Director Cavalry Corps Surgeon Geo. L. Pancoast U.S. Volunteers 1st Division Surgeon Abner Hard 8th Illinois Cavalry 2nd Division Surgeon W.W. Phillips 1st N.J. Cavalry 3rd Division Surgeon Henry Capehart 1st West Virginia Cavalry Medical Officer in charge of the corps hospitals Surgeon W.H. Rulison 9th New York Cavalry Gettysburg September 2009

Dedicated: Finished in August 1914. The locations were noted with wooden stakes in 1901.

Location: The Cavalry Corps hospital marker is located in front of the Presbyterian Church, Gettysburg. The Church still stands at the corner of Baltimore Street and High Street.

Description: Bronze plaque affixed to front of church. Erected by the Gettysburg National Military Park Commission. Denotes the location of the field hospitals of the Cavalry Corps for the Union Army of the Potomac. Hospital was established June 30 in Presbyterian church and other nearby buildings in Gettysburg. Marker located on entrance wall of Presbyterian Church.

Originally, this plaque was mounted on a granite monument as the other eight field hospitals. The church is not the original. The monument was altered in approximately 1955.

Inscription:

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC
MEDICAL DEPARTMENT FIELD HOSPITALS
CAVALRY CORPS

The hospitals of the First Division Cavalry Corps were located June 30th in this church and other nearby buildings and fell into the hands of the Confederates on the evening of July 1st. The wounded of the cavalry commands were later cared for here and in the hospitals of the infantry divisions.

Medical Director Cavalry Corps Surgeon Geo. L. Pancoast U.S. Volunteers
1st Division Surgeon Abner Hard 8th Illinois Cavalry
2nd Division Surgeon W.W. Phillips 1st N.J. Cavalry
3rd Division Surgeon Henry Capehart 1st West Virginia Cavalry Medical Officer in charge of the corps hospitals Surgeon W.H. Rulison 9th New York Cavalry

Twelfth Corps Army of the Potomac Field Hospital Monument

The Army of the Potomac’s Twelfth Corps field hospital is honored by a monument.

12th Corps Hospital Monument. Gettysburg November 2011

Dedicated: Finished in August 1914. The locations were noted with wooden stakes in 1901.

Location: The Twelfth Corps hospital marker is located on the Hospital Road, 500 feet west of the George Bushman house. Placed near actual site of 12th US Corps Hospitals. Located on east side of Hospital Road at George Bushman house.

The 12th Corps field hospitals were located on the George Bushman Farm. The house still stands, but the barn is modern.

Description: Rough-hewn granite monolith with a bronze tablet shaped like a Maltese cross mounted on slanted face.

Inscription:

Army of the Potomac
Medical Department
Field Hospitals
Twelfth Corps

The Division Field Hospitals of the Twelfth Corps were located July 2nd at the Bushman House one hundred and sixty yards east. These hospitals cared for about 1200 wounded and were in operation until about August 5th, 1863.

Medical Director 12th Corps Surgeon John McNulty U.S. Volunteers
1st Division Surgeon Artemus Chapel U.S. Volunteers
2nd Division Surgeon John E. Herbst U.S. Volunteers
Medical Officer in charge of 12th Corps Hospitals
Surgeon H. Ernest Goodman, 28th Penna. Infantry.

Eleventh Corps Army of the Potomac Field Hospital Monument

The Army of the Potomac’s Eleventh Corps field hospital is honored by a monument.

Eleventh Corps Field Hospital Monument.  11th corps hospital Gettysburg May 2009

Dedicated: Finished in August 1914. The locations were noted with wooden stakes in 1901.

Location: The 11th Corps hospital monument is located on the Hospital Road, 700 feet east of the George Spangler house. Placed near actual sites of 11th US Corps Field Hospitals. Hospitals were established July 1. Located on west side of Blacksmith Shop Road at George Spangler Lane.

The 11th Corps field hospital was located at the George Spangler Farm. This property was recently purchased by the Gettysburg Battlefield and is in the process of being rehabilitated. General Barlow was treated here, and General Armistead, mortally wounded in Pickett’s Charge, eventually died here.

Description: Rough-hewn granite monolith with a bronze tablet shaped like a Maltese cross mounted on slanted face.

Inscription:

Army of the Potomac
Medical Department
Field Hospitals
Eleventh Corps

The Division Field Hospitals of the Eleventh Corps were established July 1st at the Spangler House two hundred and thirty yards west of this point. Many of the wounded of this Corps were also cared for at the County Almshouse, Pennsylvania College, and in Gettysburg. The Division Hospitals were consolidated into a Corps Hospital about July 6th as were those of all the Corps and the Corps Hospitals continued in operation until the first week of August 1863. These hospitals cared for 1400 wounded.

Medical Director 11th Corps Surgeon George Suckley U.S. Volunteers
1st Division Surgeon Louis G. Meyer 25th Ohio Infantry
2nd Division Surgeon D.G. Brinton U.S. Volunteers
3rd Division Surgeon W.H. Thome U.S. Volunteers
Medical Officer in charge of the Corps Hospitals Surgeon J.A. Armstrong 75th Penna. Infantry

Sixth Corps Army of the Potomac Field Hospital Monument

The Army of the Potomac’s Sixth Corps field hospital is honored by a monument.

The Division Field Hospitals of the Sixth Corps were established July 2nd near the Trostle House east of Rock Creek and two hundred yards southwest of this point. These Hospitals cared for 315 wounded.  Medial Director 6th Corps Surgeon Charles O’Leary U.S. Volunteers 1st Division Surgeon E.F. Taylor 1st N.J. Infantry 2nd Division Surgeon S.J. Allen 4th Vermont Infantry 3rd Division Surgeon S.A. Holman 7th Massachusetts Infantry Medical Officer in charge of the Corps Hospitals Surgeon C.N. Chamberlain U.S. Volunteers. Gettysburg May 2009

Dedicated: Finished in August 1914. The locations were noted with wooden stakes in 1901.

Location: The Sixth Corps hospital marker is located 600 feet north of the John Trostle house, near the Hospital Road on the portion that today is known as Goulden Road, east of Rock Creek. Placed near actual sites of 6th US Corps Field Hospitals. The house and barn still stand.

Description: Rough-hewn granite monolith with a bronze tablet shaped like a Maltese cross mounted on slanted face.

Inscription:

Army of the Potomac
Medical Department
Field Hospitals
Sixth Corps

The Division Field Hospitals of the Sixth Corps were established July 2nd near the Trostle House east of Rock Creek and two hundred yards southwest of this point. These Hospitals cared for 315 wounded.

Medial Director 6th Corps Surgeon Charles O’Leary U.S. Volunteers
1st Division Surgeon E.F. Taylor 1st N.J. Infantry
2nd Division Surgeon S.J. Allen 4th Vermont Infantry
3rd Division Surgeon S.A. Holman 7th Massachusetts Infantry
Medical Officer in charge of the Corps Hospitals Surgeon C.N. Chamberlain U.S. Volunteers.

Fifth Corps Army of the Potomac Field Hospital Monument

The Army of the Potomac’s Fifth Corps field hospital is honored by a monument.

5th Corps Hospital Monument. Gettysburg November 2011

Dedicated: Finished in August 1914. The locations were noted with wooden stakes in 1901.

Location: The Fifth Corps hospital marker is on the Hospital Road, 1,200 feet north of the M. Fiscel house. This portion of the Hospital Road is today known as the Goulden Road.

Hospitals for 5th Corps were housed in a number of buildings from July 2 to August 2, 1863. The Fifth Corps Field Hospitals were located off the Taneytown Road, including at such sites as the Jacob Weikert Farm (where General Weed died and Lieutenant Hazlett was temporarily buried). The Lewis Bushman Farm became the main hospital site for the Fifth Corps. The barn may be original, the house is not. This is the farm where Colonel Vincent was carried after being mortally wounded in the groin in the battle for Little Round Top. He died here on July 7. Colonel George Willard is also reported to have died at this location.

Description: Rough-hewn granite monolith with a bronze tablet shaped like a Maltese cross mounted on slanted face.

Inscription:

Army of the Potomac
Medical Department
Field Hospitals
Fifth Corps

The Division Field Hospitals of the Fifth Corps were established July 2nd at the Weikert House and other houses near Little Round Top and along the Taneytown Road. During the night they were removed across Rock Creek and located as follows: 1st Division south of White Run on the Fiscel Farm. 2nd Division 100 rods south of White Run near the Clapsaddle House. 3rd Division one half mile west of Two Taverns and near the Pike. These Hospitals cared for 1400 wounded and remained in operation until August 2nd 1863.

Medical Director 5th Corps Surgeon John J. Milhau U.S. Army
1st Division Surgeon Edward Shippen U.S. Volunteers
2nd Division Assistant Surgeon Clinton Wagner U.S. Army
3rd Division Surgeon Louis W. Read U.S. Volunteers
Medical Officer in charge of the Corps Hospitals Surgeon A.M. Clark U.S. Volunteers.